Don’t confuse material weight of a shirt with quality

It’s a question that comes up with customers.  For generations, it has been engrained in our national psyche that the weight of something is a reflection of the quality of that item.  For the most part the perception is the heavier something weighs, the better the quality of that item.

That is only natural as in many cases; weight really can be a reflection of quality.  But in the case of material specifically used to make shirts, weight is not necessarily a reflection of quality.

In nearly all of the product descriptions on our website Thread Logic, you will see the weight of the material.  We provide that information as a way for customers to use as a point of comparison for shirts.  In addition, customers have a better understanding of the kind of shirt they are looking at.  Some of our customers live in warm climates and want a lighter weight material.

However, just because a polo shirt has a material weight of 7 ounces does not mean the material is a better quality than one that weighs 5 ounces.  It just means that the 5 oz. shirt is a lighter weight material than the 7 oz. shirt-nothing more.

So how does one compare shirt quality?  One of the best reflections of shirt quality is the price.  Like something things, you get what you pay for.  And logo embroidered apparel is no different.

For example, the NIKE Dri-fit golf shirt that sells for $45.75 including the embroidery of your logo.  The material in this shirt weighs 4.4 oz.  Here is another golf shirt, that with the embroidery of your logo sells for $23.25 and it weighs 5.6 oz.  Which shirt is better quality shirt?  Not the heavier one.  It is the more expensive NIKE shirt.

So when comparing shirts, whether they are golf polo shirts, button downs or even sweatshirts, use the material weight for the purposes it is intended and not as a way to measure quality.

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